LATEST STORM MOVING THROUGH TODAY...

A line of severe thunderstorms moved through So Cal early this morning, causing high winds, torrential rains, hail and lightning. ABC 7 News LA showed some of the following dramatic photos of the weather that hit just to our west.

Lightning strike near Koreatown.

Lightning strike near Koreatown.

Hail at USC in LA.

Hail at USC in LA.

Tree branch falls through roof in northern Orange County.

Tree branch falls through roof in northern Orange County.

Earlier today, the storm looked impressive as a dramatic line of thunderstorms formed. Even LAX briefly lost power due to the strong storm. Here's a look at the radar image from earlier this morning.

The potent low pressure system is still moving through So Cal today, but the squall line responsible for the dramatic weather has been replaced by scattered showers and thunderstorms this afternoon. Mountain snow is falling above about 3,500 - 4,000 feet as well.

Satellite image around 11:45a Monday shows the cold front moving through with scattered showers/thunderstorms following in the unstable airmass left behind.

Satellite image around 11:45a Monday shows the cold front moving through with scattered showers/thunderstorms following in the unstable airmass left behind.

High winds may kick up at times later this afternoon and into Tuesday before fair and warmer weather returns mid week. Another storm is expected late Friday or Saturday. It is unclear at this point if the deserts will receive any rain or not with the next storm, but the mountains of the state are expecting at least moderate to heavy amounts.

A WINDY SUNDAY ACROSS THE DESERTS

Sunday was quite windy across the Coachella Valley. Strong west winds were blowing across the southern part of the state, and periods of blowing dust and sand were common in the windiest areas.

Palm Springs International Airport experienced turbulence and erratic winds throughout the day, due to something called "rotors". Take a look at the observations yesterday:

These type of conditions can challenge the pilots hoping to deliver a smooth arrival into our desert home. Air flowing across the nearby mountains forms circulations and waves, which can cause winds to fluctuate wildly in both speed and direction. Here's a graphic illustrating how this occurs:

Sometimes the rotor circulations will stay above the ground, and occasionally, like yesterday, they will cause dramatic wind shifts at the surface. Winds in many areas were blowing from the west yesterday, but other areas, especially in Central and Southern Palm Springs, were experiencing winds from the northeast, east and southeast at times. This same process is what causes standing lenticular clouds to form, as winds blowing perpendicular to the mountains disrupt the flow of air and cause eddies to form.

LONG TERM RAINFALL STILL LOOKS GREAT FOR CALIFORNIA

Long range forecasting for the rest of the month still show copious amounts of moisture headed for at least Central and Northern California. Southern California will likely continue to be grazed by the tail end of several of these storms, while the mountains in the rest of the state may very well see snowfall totals over 10 feet this month if this trend continues. Hoping for a March Miracle!